News For Tag "hamsa subramanian"

  • Food Allergies, Grocery Shopping and Taking Precautions During COVID-19 Pandemic

    Food Allergies, Grocery Shopping and Taking Precautions During COVID-19 Pandemic

    posted by Hamsa Subramanian, MD, Allergist and Immunologist on Thursday, April 30, 2020

    As families spend more time indoors, parents are searching for new activities to keep the kids busy. I commonly hear that families have turned to baking and cooking as a creative way to fill time. For children with food allergies, it's important to be careful and maintain a safe environment while working in the kitchen. Here are a few ideas on how to enjoy cooking activities with proper precautions.

  • Caring for Kids with Food Allergies

    Caring for Kids with Food Allergies

    posted on Monday, April 15, 2019

    Food allergies are on the rise in our children. Today, eight food allergens are responsible for the majority of allergic reactions. These foods include cow's milk, eggs, fish, peanuts, shellfish, soy, tree nuts and wheat. Communication and coordination can help prevent a reaction.

  • Ask the Specialists: Featuring Dr. Hamsa Subramanian

    Ask the Specialists: Featuring Dr. Hamsa Subramanian

    posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2018

    Dr. Hamsa Subramanian was recently featured in the October 16 issue of Town & Style Magazine in St. Louis.

  • Tips for Treating Eczema

    Tips for Treating Eczema

    posted on Wednesday, October 25, 2017

    Eczema is a chronic skin condition that can cause painful and unsightly symptoms, such as dry, itchy skin and red, sore rashes. But with the right treatment, eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, can be well-managed.

  • Ragweed Allergies Hit Hardest in Early Fall

    Ragweed Allergies Hit Hardest in Early Fall

    posted on Friday, August 11, 2017

    Spring may be the prime pollen season for many allergy sufferers. But for others, their sneezing and watery eyes are just beginning. That's because ragweed pollen usually reaches its peak in mid-September. The weeds grow in most regions, typically blooming and producing a fine-powder pollen from August into November, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) says.